Let It Rain

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“The best thing one can do when it’s raining is to let it rain.”
– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Temporary

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No Hesitation (In Praise of Weeds)

Not that weed. 🙂

A friend once told me not to bring this orchid home because “it’s a weed among orchids.”

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I decided to take it home anyway because I’ve tried other varieties and none of them survived. This fellow, for all its humble pedigree, kept blooming. I think it’s because it doesn’t listen to what others say.

If plants overthink their reason for being, I guess many of them won’t be around.

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Just think of the cactus growing in the desert.

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The Sun doesn’t judge who gets its light.

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The jasmine keeps on spreading its tiny flowers and scent.

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Growth is life and life is growth.

We be like plants and hesitate less.

Now, for that other kind of weed… 🙂

Tentative

A Roman Garden With Bellflowers

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An ancient Roman sculpture garden is recreated at the Courtyard of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

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At this time of year, chimney bellflowers (Campanula pyramidalis) appear in the courtyard. The flowers are grown from seed and take two years to reach their six-foot height!

Quite an impressive work of horticulture.

“Isn’t it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?”
– Douglas Adams

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Fragrant Surprise from Ylang-ylang

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The essential oil from Ylang-ylang is highly valued and used in perfumes such as Chanel No. 5.

Its fragrance is described as “rich and deep with notes of rubber and custard, and bright with hints of jasmine and neroli.”

No wonder the garden smells heavenly when it blooms!


The name ylang-ylang is derived from the Tagalog term ilang-ilang for the tree that is a reduplicative form of the word ilang, meaning “wilderness”, alluding to the tree’s natural habitat… The plant is native to the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia and is commonly grown in Madagascar, Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Comoros Islands. It grows in full or partial sun, and prefers the acidic soils of its native rainforest habitat. – Wikipedia

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A Different Take on the Lowly Rambutan

The rains have come, and so have the fruits. This year, the rambutans are already bearing fruit!

Fresh from the tree, to the plate, to the… lens?

 

Rambutan, like most tropical fruits, is eaten by opening/peeling the skin, hence it can be eaten fresh.

 

These look like eggs in a nest… or aliens waiting to hatch…

 

Who thought rambutan could be so… wet? No wonder ants like them!

 

As kids we were told not to play with our food — but who listened anyway? 🙂

I better get to them before the ants do!


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